Projekt F – The Butterfly Effect EP – Self Released

Projekt F – The Butterfly Effect EP – Self Released

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I must admit that I wasn’t overly smitten with this. But then after a few listens with the volume increasing with each listen, I began to appreciate Projekt F‘s take on the industrial genre. Apparently The Butterfly Effect explores the relationship between man and god, and the self-titled opener starts with some haunting piano synth. There’s a pause – and then boom; driving guitars and blistering drums. Someone’s banging on a bit of metal pipe just to ensure that the listener knows this is industrial. There’s a weird dissonance between the rather watery, even tremulous, clean vocal and delivery of the harsher singing styles that are apparent on this EP. I prefer the harder vocals personally. There’s a mellow piano bit and then it all gets chunky again. Easy comparisons include Combichrist, Nine Inch Nails and/or Rob Zombie. The first track slips into Tongue (the single from this EP) and while it’s not ground-breaking or cutting edge, it is hard enough to satisfy. As i said; the louder you play it, the better it gets. It’s stomping mosh-times on the dance floor with Cut Your Wings and I was transported back to the 90’s despite the desperate trembling vocal (Brian Molko from Placebo comes to mind) – give me more of that raging harsh vocal, I say. You get a massive electro finish as the track slides into Unbegun and it’s doof doof doof ahoy. There’s a similarity with a lot of the guitar riffs but these similarities are softened by the dark synths and pianos – there’s also a quite delightful techno mid-section, which is nice.

The oddly titled 03 47 09 08 1945 (obviously there’s meaning in that title somewhere) is a brief electro/acoustic interlude before it’s back to the riffage with Fat Man, which is charmingly thrashy with fat bass. Unfortunately the whiney vocal keeps popping up to distract from the meat of the tune. When finishes the album with a gentle piano outro coupled with Robert Oppenheimer adding an extra dark twist to the final track.

Not a bad effort but next time, a little less of that clean vocal please.

Albert Petersen
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